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3.14 Intellectual Freedom Policy


Adopted Date: November 2012
Reviewed Date: April 2017
Review Date: April 2021

Purpose

The West Lincoln Public Library Board recognizes that it has a fundamental responsibility to advocate for, and to uphold the principles of intellectual freedom. This policy is intended to ensure the rights of individuals to access any lawful information that they require.

Process

The West Lincoln Public Library Board adopts the Canadian Library Association Statement on Intellectual Freedom, Attached as Appendix “A” to this policy.

It is the responsibility of the West Lincoln Public Library Board, and those that work in the West Lincoln Public Libraries, to guarantee and facilitate access to all lawful expressions of knowledge and intellectual activity, including those which some elements of society may consider to be unconventional, unpopular or unacceptable.

It is the responsibility of the Head Librarians of each branch to make available all of the library's public facilities and services to all individuals and groups who need them.

The Head Librarians at each branch will resist all efforts to limit the exercise of these responsibilities, while recognizing the right of criticism by individuals and groups.

The West Lincoln Public Library Board directs the Chief Executive Officer to ensure that the principles of intellectual freedom are integrated into all organizational policies, procedures and practices.

3.14 Appendix A: Policy on Intellectual Freedom

Canadian Library Association / Association canadienne des bibliothèques Position Statement on Intellectual Freedom

Approved by Executive Council ~ June 27, 1974; Amended November 17, 1983; and November 18, 1985

All persons in Canada have the fundamental right, as embodied in the nation's Bill of Rights and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, to have access to all expressions of knowledge, creativity and intellectual activity, and to express their thoughts publicly. This right to intellectual freedom, under the law, is essential to the health and development of Canadian society.

Libraries have a basic responsibility for the development and maintenance of intellectual freedom.

It is the responsibility of libraries to guarantee and facilitate access to all expressions of knowledge and intellectual activity, including those which some elements of society may consider to be unconventional, unpopular or unacceptable. To this end, libraries shall acquire and make available the widest variety of materials.

It is the responsibility of libraries to guarantee the right of free expression by making available all the library's public facilities and services to all individuals and groups who need them.

Libraries should resist all efforts to limit the exercise of these responsibilities while recognizing the right of criticism by individuals and groups.

Both employees and employers in libraries have a duty, in addition to their institutional responsibilities, to uphold these principles.

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